The Anatomy of a Government Bid Opportunity from DLA

The Anatomy of a Government Bid Opportunity from DLA

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Understanding how the US Government structures bid packages is critical to success in the Federal and Military procurement arena. It can allow you to quickly qualify a government bid for a bid/no bid decision.

In this article we will look at the structure of a bid package, and apply it to the most common bid requests seen by those selling parts and products. More specifically, those requests found on the Defense Internet Bid Board System (DIBBS)

The Anatomy of a Government Bid

Below are the elements making up the anatomy of a government bid. Although a bid may not always contain the complete bid anatomy, common elements can be found.

• The Solicitation
• Section A – Contract clauses, Set Aside and Inspection information
• Section B – Supplies or Services and Cost/Pricing
• Section C – Statement of Work
• Section D – Packaging & Marking
• Section E – Inspection and Acceptance
• Section F – Deliveries or Performance
• Section G – Contract Administration Data
• Section H – Special Contract Requirements
• Section I – Contract Clauses
• Section J – List of Attachments
• Section K – Representatives, Certificates and Other statements of Bidders
• Section L – Instructions, Conditions and Notices to Bidders
• Section M – Evaluation Factors for Award

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Common Elements of a Government Bid Opportunity

A DIBBS request is a prime example of a contract not having the complete anatomy. However, the common elements do contain the information impacting our decisions. 

• The Solicitation
• Section A – Contract clauses, Set Aside and Inspection information
• Section B – Supplies or Services and Cost/Pricing
• Section F – Deliveries or Performance
• Section I – Contract Clauses
• Section K – Representatives, Certificates and Other statements of Bidders

It may also include;

• Section L – Instructions, Conditions and Notices to Bidders
• Section M – Evaluation Factors for Award

A Quicker Bid/No-Bid Decision

First, we have the solicitation form, or bid request. This page contains the date the bid is due , if it is for a small business, and the solicitation number. You will also find the issuing office and contact information.

Now, your solicitation number itself, can tell you a lot. This number can identify the location of the buyer and if it is an automated buy. Meaning, it is entirely machine managed.

For more on the secrets this number can reveal check out Unlock the Secrets Behind the DLA solicitation number.

• Section A – Contains information such as, NAICS code, place of inspection, and if request is subject to micro purchases. Past procurement information can also be found here.

• Section B – Section B is of the utmost importance to you. Here, you will find the National Stock Number (NSN), packaging requirements, deliver due by and FOB data.

Most of all, you can quickly identify if the technical data package is restricted or not.

In Conclusion

Understanding the bid anatomy means you can quickly extract information affecting your decision making. Furthermore, the common elements impacting decisions can be found in sections A and B.

Note: It is important to pay attention to the Contract Line Item Number (CLIN) and delivery location, as there many be multiple line orders and delivery locations